Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th Asia Pacific Congress on Oil and Gas Bangkok, Thailand.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Jean-Marie Basset

KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC) and Physical Sciences and Engineering Division (PSE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Some new approaches in petrochemical industries: From methane to carbon and hydrogen and from crude oil to chemicals
Oil and Gas 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jean-Marie Basset photo
Biography:

.Professor Jean-Marie Basset is the Distinguished Professor for Chemical Science in the Physical Science and Engineering Division at King Abdullah University of Science & Technology.
Prof. Basset, who has authored more than 500 scientific papers 50 patents, pioneered the field of “Surface Organometallic Chemistry", which focuses on possible relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.
Professor Basset received his PhD in 1969 from the University of Lyon, France. After a postdoctoral position in Toronto he moved to the Institute of Catalysis in Lyon where he became vice-director.
In 1987, he founded the Laboratory of Surface Organometallic Chemistry that became later the laboratory of Chemistry, Catalysis, Polymer, Process (C2P2). Professor Basset’s Lyon lab was home to 100 scientists, including Nobel Laureate Yves Chauvin who got his Nobel in 2005.
In 2009 he moved to the King Abdulla University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia as director of the KAUST Catalysis Center.

Abstract:

The world evolution in petroleum and petrochemicals is changing rapidly. The demand for energy is increasing quite drastically but diversification of energy resources is a parameter that can no longer be ignored. Simultaneously the demand for chemicals (especially propylene, ethylene, and aromatics) is increasing even more rapidly.
In this context the only source of carbon is still crude oil and the best source of clean energy is natural gas decomposition products like hydrogen and C.
In this lecture we will present our recent results on two main topics that we have developed in the Kaust Catalysis Centre (KCC) in relation with ARAMCO and AIR LIQUIDE: from crude oil to olefins and from natural gas to carbon and hydrogen

Keynote Forum

Dr. Jianli Hu

Chair Professor and the Director of Center for Innovation in Gas Research and Utilization at West Virginia University, USA

Keynote: Challenges in Direct, Non-Oxidative Conversion of Shale Gas to Chemicals

Time : TBD

Oil and Gas 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Jianli Hu photo
Biography:

Dr. Jianli (John Hu), an experienced scientist and engineer, is a Chair Professor and the Director of Center for Innovation in Gas Research and Utilization at West Virginia University. As a director, John leads the creation of an interdisciplinary research center related to natural gas utilization, which is a strategic area of investment for WVU. John worked as a Director of Technology Innovation at Koch Industries, where he was responsible for developing future technological growth areas related to petrochemicals and catalytic and biological processing. John worked as a research manager at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, undertaking DOE, DOD, and NASA projects.  In the late 1990s, he served as a lead refinery engineer for BP Oil. John has been granted 25 U.S. patents and published more than 90 peer reviewed journal and conference papers.

Abstract:

In the United States and rest of the world, there are abundant shale gas resources which are either physically or economically stranded.  Commercially, natural gas conversion to chemicals is based on an indirect conversion route via syngas, followed by subsequent conversion processes (methanol plus MTG process, or Fischer-Tropsch and product refining).  The indirect conversion processes are very capital intensive, and less energy efficient. This presentation emphasizes the direct conversion of natural gas constituents (C1-C3) into aromatics and olefins using transition metal promoted ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts. Catalyst activity, selectivity, deactivation and regeneration of metal-promoted ZSM-5 zeolite catalysts will be discussed. We will introduce a new approach that employs non-thermal plasma to intensify catalytic reaction for natural gas conversion. Under low reaction severity, this approach synergistically integrates plasma reaction chemistry with novel heterogeneous catalysis that decouples methane activation from catalytic surface reaction, shifting rate-determining step from methane activation (cracking C-H bond) to surface C-C formation. One of the focus area of the research is to elucidate deactivation mechanism of Ga-Pt prompted HZSM-5 and investigate feasibility of regenerating deactivated catalysts for commercial viability.

Keynote Forum

Dr. Shikha Sharma

Professor of Geology and Director of Biogeochemistry Laboratory at West Virginia University, USA

Keynote: Role of Field Shale Laboratories in Unconventional Resource Development

Time : TBD

Oil and Gas 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Shikha Sharma photo
Biography:

Dr. Shikha Sharma is Professor of Geology and Director of Biogeochemistry Laboratory at West Virginia University (WVU).  Her shale gas research program is funded by research grants from several federal agencies like National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy and US Geological Survey. She has authored/co-authored several publications in high impact international peer review journals.  Her current research projects focus on understanding biogeochemical controls on shale gas production, kerogen chemistry and water-rock-microbe interactions in shale reservoirs after injection of hydraulic fracturing fluids in shale reservoirs.

Abstract:

Shale gas is a critical and rapidly-growing area of energy where research lags behind exploration and production activity. The extensive drilling of black shales over the last decade has provided access to a large number of well cores, produced fluid and gas samples, and geophysical data from shale basins across the United States (US). These data and samples provide an opportunity to not only better characterize the physical-biogeochemical attributes of the reservoirs but also understand the chemical interaction of hydraulic fracturing fluids with formation rocks and minerals, and the temporal and geochemical evolution of produced water.  However, shale reservoirs are geologically complex, and every play is unique in several ways. Therefore, to help improve the efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction and shed light environmental impacts, there is need to conduct integrated studies in different shale basins. Development of Field Shale Laboratories with the help of funding by federal agencies is a right step in this direction. The test well sites have enabled the researchers from different academic and research institutes to develop collaborative projects with oil and gas companies. The primary objectives of multidisciplinary research conducted at these Field Shale labs are to 1) develop new technologies to extract shale gas more efficiently with minimal environmental impact, 2) better understand the geophysical, geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological, and  mechanical properties of shale, produced hydrocarbons, fluids and gas, 3) understand changes in air/water quality before and after drilling, and 4) help improve public understanding of shale gas drilling activities. Sharma will discuss results from research conducted at two such shale gas test well sites in Marcellus Shale basin of north east US.

Keynote Forum

Dr. Jingsheng Ma

Professor in Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, UK

Keynote: Digital Rock Physics for Petro-physical Analysis of Reservoir Rocks: Challenges and Opportunities

Time : TBD

Oil and Gas 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Jingsheng Ma photo
Biography:

Jingsheng Ma is Associate Professor in Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University.
In past 20 years or more, Jingsheng Ma’s research focuses on developing mathematical models and computational techniques for better addressing scientific and engineering problems concerning the petroleum industry and others. He has been involved in and has led several projects on Digital Rock Physics (DRP). He has more than 90 publications and has been invited to speak on international conferences and workshops on DRP. He has also served on several conference committees and is an associated editor of an international journal.

Abstract:

Digital Rock Physics (DRP) has emerged, from more than 20 years research, as a step-changing technology for complementing traditional petrophysical analysis at core plug and wellbore scales. DRP involves: 1) imaging rock samples; 2) image-based rock characterisation and; 3) rock model reconstruction; 4) numerical simulation of physical processes; and 5) predication of effective rock properties. With the increasing capability of tomographic imaging and high-fidelity numerical modelling, DRP has been widely recognised and gradually adopted by oil and gas industry.
DRP offers possibilities to answer a much wider range of ‘what-if’ questions concerning any specific types of formations. Exemplar questions are those concerning the impacts of geological heterogeneity of formations, in terms of structures and lithological compositions and fluid in places, on hydrocarbon storage and transmission. Such questions cannot be addressed fully by examining measurements taken at in-situ and/or laboratory-controlled conditions alone but in complementation of simulating appropriate physicochemical processes on adjustable rock models in DRP. However, DRP faces great challenges in dealing with formations, such as shale, tight sandstone and carbonates, where geological heterogeneity is complex and gives rise to high-level uncertainty in digital rock characterisation and in measurements.
In this presentation, the author highlights some recent progresses that have been made by the author and his associates in characterising geological heterogeneity and quantifying their uncertainty on fluid flow in DRP. Examples include: mineral characterisation of clastic rocks, characterisation of cross-lamination in sandstones, multiscale DRP for shale gas flow, and wettability modelling on heterogenous mineral surface.

Keynote Forum

Dr. Songgang Qiu

Professor, West Virginia University, USA

Keynote: The use of Stirling convertors in the transportation and storage of natural gas

Time : TBD

Oil and Gas 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Songgang Qiu photo
Biography:

Dr. Songgang Qiu completed his PhD in 1996 from University of Minnesota and postdoctoral studies from University of Arizona and University of Minnesota. He is the Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the director of Energy Efficiency and Energy Conversion Laboratory at West Virginia University. He has published more than 100 peer reviewed papers and has served as Principal Investigator for more than forty sponsored research projects.

Abstract:

To store, transport or use large quantities of natural gas, it is generally cryogenically cooled and liquefied at temperature around 110 K. After natural gas has been liquefied, boil-off can occur during transportation. This gas increases the pressure within the container is and usually vented into the atmosphere. This not only gives a significant pollution to the environment (Methane is the second most prevalent greenhouse gas) but it is also a loss of revenue. Venting boil-off gas can be a serious operational cost. A novel method of preventing this loss of an irreplaceable resource is to use Stirling Cryogenics as a means of re-liquefying the boil-off gas (BOG). Given their compact size and reliability, multiple units could be employed to handle various quantities of boil-off gas forming a flexible and redundant system. Additionally, Stirling cryo-coolers have been used in cryogenic applications for several decades. In addition to boil-off gas during transportation and storage, another waste of natural gas occurs as gas flaring at petroleum refineries, natural gas processing plants as well as at oil and gas production sites where excess gas is simply burnt due to a lack of means to capture and store the natural gas. Stirling Cryogenics are a cost-effective means of liquifying the wasted gas again vastly reducing the emission of a fuel refinery. This paper presents a new Stirling Cryogenics system that can be made at very low cost and has very high efficiency in comparison to traditional liquefication means.

Oil and Gas 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hossein Jalalifar photo
Biography:

Prof. Jalalifar is working in mining and petroleum departments, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Iran as academic staff. He published more than 180 Journal and conference papers and published one rock mechanics’s Persian book and translated an English book in field of tunneling and also has written two English books’s chapters in field of rock bolting and wellbore stability.

Abstract:

In recent years, hydraulic fracturing is such a method, which was used in oil and gas wells to enhance recovery in low permeability reservoirs.  I‌n h‌y‌d‌r‌a‌u‌l‌i‌c f‌r‌a‌c‌t‌u‌r‌i‌n‌g operation, t‌h‌e f‌l‌u‌i‌d w‌i‌t‌h high p‌r‌e‌s‌s‌u‌r‌e i‌s i‌n‌j‌e‌c‌t‌e‌d i‌n‌t‌o t‌h‌e  w‌e‌l‌l t‌h‌a‌t h‌a‌d b‌e‌e‌n i‌s‌o‌l‌a‌t‌e‌d b‌y p‌a‌c‌k‌e‌r‌s.

 The prediction of fracture direction is one of the main challenges of hydraulic fracturing operation. A n‌u‌m‌e‌r‌i‌c‌a‌l m‌e‌t‌h‌o‌d r‌e‌ce‌n‌t‌l‌y has been d‌e‌v‌e‌l‌o‌p‌e‌d f‌o‌r s‌i‌m‌u‌l‌a‌t‌i‌o‌n o‌f crack propagation named t‌h‌e e‌x‌t‌e‌n‌d‌e‌d f‌i‌n‌i‌t‌e e‌l‌e‌m‌e‌n‌t m‌e‌t‌h‌o‌d (X‌F‌E‌M). I‌n t‌h‌i‌s m‌e‌t‌h‌o‌d, t‌h‌e n‌o‌d‌e‌s s‌u‌r‌r‌o‌u‌n‌d‌i‌n‌g t‌h‌e c‌r‌a‌c‌k‌s a‌r‌e e‌n‌r‌i‌c‌h‌e‌d t‌h‌r‌o‌u‌g‌h s‌p‌e‌c‌i‌a‌l f‌u‌n‌c‌t‌i‌o‌n‌s. A‌c‌c‌o‌r‌d‌i‌n‌g‌l‌y, f‌o‌r s‌u‌c‌h n‌o‌d‌e‌s, t‌h‌e d‌e‌g‌r‌e‌e‌s o‌f f‌r‌e‌e‌d‌o‌m a‌r‌e i‌n‌c‌r‌e‌a‌s‌e‌d, w‌h‌i‌c‌h r‌e‌s‌u‌l‌t‌s i‌n g‌r‌e‌a‌t‌e‌r d‌i‌s‌p‌l‌a‌c‌e‌m‌e‌n‌t a‌r‌o‌u‌n‌d e‌a‌c‌h c‌r‌a‌c‌k. I‌n t‌h‌i‌s paper, a X‌F‌E‌M c‌o‌d‌e w‌a‌s d‌e‌v‌e‌l‌o‌p‌e‌d t‌o s‌i‌m‌u‌l‌a‌t‌e t‌h‌e h‌y‌d‌r‌a‌u‌l‌i‌c f‌r‌a‌c‌t‌u‌r‌i‌n‌g p‌r‌o‌b‌l‌e‌m. In order to validate of the developed Code, the results are compared with some two-dimensional analytical solutions and confirmed by its correctness. The results showed that, in the case where the initial crack is in direction of the maximum main stress (σ1), the crack is propagated in its direction (perpendicular to the minimum main stress, σ3). But when the initial crack is not in direction of he maximum stress, crack propagates in that direction and with increasing from the well axis it returns to the maximum main stress direction.